Sunday, November 20, 2016

Midlife Fun: Inspired by Art of Gustav Klimt



Hello dear friends and welcome to the 5th edition of the Midlife Fun link-up which I offer in collaboration with two fantastic bloggers from Germany Tina and Beate at the end of each month. In November, we invite you to explore the art of the famous Austrian painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918). We encourage you to create your own outfit inspired by this wonderful master, but also feel free to join us as you are - the link-up is open till December 20th.

Make sure to visit my talented co-hosts Tina and Beate over at their blogs too!
Beate's interpretation of the theme:




As probably many of you are, I am mesmerized by Klimt's bold, rich, ornate paintings and his generous usage of golden leaf technique. His art really isn't like anything else. But just as any other unique genius known to the world, Klimt had to begin as a classic painter. I was curious to look at his early works, and often I wouldn't be able to tell that they were painted by Klimt. The talent and skills are there, but only at the turn of the century, he found his own voice, and his works started looking truly original. It is encouraging to me, and I think it should be to any artist. 




The two paintings that are shown here, Water Serpents I and Water Serpents II, were made in 1904-07 and are considered to mark a climax in Klimt's style. Many motifs that we seen here will be developed in later works as well. Klimt lived quite an intense, but short life (only 55 years) and did not have enough time to develop a new, less ornate and more focused on color style that is found in some of his late paintings, so he will always remain the author of sensual, allegorical paintings like these two, with fluid lines, organic shapes, transparency and of course, lots of gold. 



And that's what I'm trying to transfer into my outfit too. The gauzy skirt and clear heels for transparency, the velvet for sensuous feeling, the bell sleeves and collar of my jacket for organic shapes, the necklace for fluid movement, and lots of gold! When I bought this purse a couple of years ago, I thought it was probably inspired by Gustav Klimt in both color and ornament. And last but not least - redhead women are not rare objects of Klimt's paintings at all! So here you have it - my own take on the art of Gustav Klimt, created with the pieces from my wardrobe (half of which are thrifted and/or vintage). I had so much fun creating it!


Jacket and top - thrifted via Goodwill
Skirt and sunnies - Christian Siriano for Lane Bryant
Boots - Ashley Stewart
Necklace - Chico's Collectibles (last year?)
Bracelets - vintage via Citizen Rosebud and old LB
Purse - via TJ MAXX (old)

Linking up with Patti's Visible Monday



17 comments:

  1. fabulous!!!
    "jugendstil" on two crystal heeled legs! :-)
    gold with its warm shine suits you very well. and all that rich textures...... perfect winter festive ensemble!! hot cider anyone?
    as i saw your collage i (belated) recognized that you and tina have red hair like klimt heroines! how great is this!
    i hope you´r o.k. with my take on the theme.....
    much love and huge hugs! xxxxxx

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    1. Beate, I'm not just OK - I am thrilled with your post! So many great ensembles, and inspiring read! This was a fun challenge.

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  2. Very clever to use that skirt in your interpretation, Natalia. Klimt's work comprises tiny squares of colour, almost like patchwork. The gold and rich colours are fabulous as are those boots. xxx

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    1. I thought about squares too, Vix! Thanks for linking your fantastic post!

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  3. ingenious!!! So adorable and successful interpretation. I love that you have it in your closet, like me, and no shopping :)
    Great challenge and really midlife fun!. I am grateful to be a part of it. Thanks Natalia.
    Much love and hugs and kisses from London, Tina

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  4. How fun to be inspired by paintings!!
    And as a shoe girl, I'm in love with those burgundy boots!!
    jodie
    www.jtouchofstyle.com

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    1. Aren't they magic, Jodie? Thanks for linking!

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  5. wouuu, such a fabulous inspiration! and you look so elegant!, I love all those geometric details, rich textures, golden touches, everything is adding a layer and everything works nicely!. Gorgeous!
    besos

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    1. Thank you. Monica! I'm also happy how this outfit came together. :)

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  6. You have captured your Klimt theme perfectly with your richness of textures and details.The gold in your top and your jewelery add that luxurious touch that was a theme of his work.Those boots are perfect with their perspex heels.Just wonderful dear Natalia.

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    1. Thank you, Jill! I am so thrilled that you like it!

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  7. Wonderful outfit, dearest Natalia,
    and a very inspiring theme! I especially like your unusual boots - but I am very enthusiastic about ALL OF your dress! I am taking part today with a (many years ago) self-painted silk coat.
    Hugs from Austria, Traude

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    1. Thank you and welcome to the challenge, dear Traude!

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  8. All painters say that it took them ages to find their own distinctive style. Some describe it as almost an accident- that is what it feels like at the beginning. Almost unconscious. They feel like they did something wrong, but then they look at it better and see it is as it should be. Really, I read this so many times, it is what a lot of illustrators and painters say- when they start to discover their own true style it almost always comes as a great surprise to themselves.

    I felt the same sensation you did when I was at one exhibition by Emanuel Vidović. His earlier paintings were beautiful and his talent was evident but they could have been painted by some other talented artist. His later work is different. You just know it is him when you look at them. The style, the colours...all of them so very specific and unique only to him. His earlier work is beautiful but his later work is pure mysticism, a portal to another dimension and time. It is more than just a display of skill and talent, it comes from his soul- and that is where all great art comes from.

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    1. Thank you for sharing this, Ivana! I not only strongly believe, but I think I can say at this point that I know that art comes from much deeper part of ourselves than our conscious mind. We discover ourselves as we continue doing our art, so of course many things come as a surprise - art is exploration, a road of discovery. I am curious about the artist you mentioned here - I will look him up.

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